<![CDATA[Awaaz Foundation - News]]>Wed, 22 Nov 2017 07:51:39 +0530Weebly<![CDATA[Mumbai’s Wadala was least noisy area in India during Diwali]]>Sun, 26 Nov 2017 18:30:00 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/mumbais-wadala-was-least-noisy-area-in-india-during-diwaliMumbai’s Wadala was least noisy area in India during Diwali
The CPCB recorded average decibel levels, which is calculated after recording the minimum (Lmin) and maximum noise levels
MUMBAI Updated: Oct 27, 2017 10:15 IST
 
Badri Chatterjee
Hindustan Times

The minimum sound level recorded across India on Diwali during the day and night was at the station located near Acworth Hospital, opposite Karve Garden, Wadala(HT photo for representation)
   
           
Although the city celebrated a quieter Diwali in comparison to other metropolises in the country, three noise monitoring stations at Bandra, Navi Mumbai, and Churchgate , recorded the highest noise levels during the festival. This was revealed in the latest report tabled by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB).
On the other hand, the minimum sound level recorded across India on Diwali during the day and night was at the station located near Acworth Hospital, opposite Karve Garden, Wadala that saw a 59% drop in noise levels from 2016. Noise levels during the day were recorded at 42 dB (sound of a library), and during the night was 44dB (bird calls).
The CPCB recorded average decibel (dB Leq) levels, which is calculated after recording the minimum (Lmin) and maximum (Lmax) noise levels. The noise monitoring station at Government Polytechnic, Kherwadi, along the Western Express Highway, Bandra (East), recorded the highest noise levels in the city at 73 decibel (dB) during the day and 72 dB at night, which is as loud as a vacuum cleaner. The area near Fortis Hiranandani Hospital in Navi Mumbai, recorded noise levels at 70 dB during the day (as loud as a radio or television audio), and 63 dB during the night (the sound of conversation in a restaurant). The area around Ambassador Hotel, VN Road, opposite Barabourne Stadium in Churchgate recorded 70 dB during the day and 69 dB during the night (air conditioning unit at 100 feet).
“We have seen a significant decline in noise levels over the years in Mumbai, especially during festivals such as Diwali. The credit goes to the citizens, as they have understood the health hazards of environmental issues such as noise and air pollution, and are actively participating to curtail them,” said D Saha, additional director, CPCB. “The city has set an example for all other metros for future festivals.”
HT had reported on October 22 that anti-noise campaigners from Awaaz Foundation had found that noise levels were much higher this Diwali than last year with the maximum decibel level at 117.8dB, almost as loud as a thunderclap, at Marine Drive at 11.30pm. Last year, noise levels were at 113.5dB. However, in 2013 and 2015, levels were as high as 124dB and 123.1dB.
“Although maximum readings recorded by me were higher on Diwali day, the general use of firecrackers has led to significant decline in peak noise levels. Mumbaiites have made the fight against noise a public movement. What is now missing is the political will,” said Sumaira Abdulali, convener, Awaaz Foundation.
As per the CPCB report, of the 10 monitoring stations in Mumbai, Andheri (station located atop Bisleri Pvt Ltd building, BD Sawant Marg), Powai (station – atop L&T building along Saki Vihar Road) and Kandivli (Mahindra building along Akruli Road), all met noise standards for industrial zones. The report also found that three Bandra, Navi Mumbai and Powai stations showed an increasing trend during Diwali this year as compared to 2015 and 2016.
The CPCB recorded ambient noise levels across 70 locations in seven cities (Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata, Lucknow, Bengaluru and Hyderabad) during Diwali. Officials said the Mumbai was one of the quietest cities owing to awareness among citizens for environmental concerns as opposed to cities like Hyderabad (noisiest in India), Bengaluru, Chennai and Lucknow where high noise levels were recorded during the festival. In February 2016, a CPCB analysis found Mumbai to be the noisiest city in India after a series of regular ambient noise monitoring from 2011 to 2014.
]]>
<![CDATA[October 17th, 2017]]>Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:30:00 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/october-17th-2017]]><![CDATA[Nobody wants to hear you out]]>Sun, 15 Oct 2017 18:30:00 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/nobody-wants-to-hear-you-out]]><![CDATA[Maharashtra: Tests show crackers exceed noise limits]]>Wed, 04 Oct 2017 18:30:00 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/maharashtra-tests-show-crackers-exceed-noise-limitsMaharashtra: Tests show crackers exceed noise limits
While the single crackers were found to be within their permissible limits of 125 dB(A), with most measuring between 116 to 119 dB(A), they were still found to be higher than last year's highest reading of 117 dB(A).
 
Written by Benita Chacko | Mumbai | Updated: October 5, 2017 8:43 am

<img class="wp-image-2551572 size-full" src="http://images.indianexpress.com/2015/11/kurali-crackers-759.jpg" alt="firecrackers, diwali 2017, firecrackers pollution, firecrackers noise pollution, firecrackers air pollution, Maharashtra Pollution Control Board, Awaaz Foundation" /> “The smoke and dust pollution caused by all the crackers seem to be higher than last year,” read the report prepared by Awaaz Foundation. (Express Photo)
A firecracker testing conducted by the Awaaz Foundation along with the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) has shown that the series crackers violated the prescribed noise-pollution limit of 105 dB(A), setting the stage for a noisy Diwali.
“The prescribed noise limits for series crackers is 105 dB(A) and most exceeded this limit. Firecrackers like the 10,000 Lar, Ooh La! La! And Street Fighter measured 112.6, 107 and 109.9 dB(A) respectively,” said Suraiya Artes from the Awaaz Foundation. The MPCB will recommend to the Controller of Explosives that these firecrackers be banned.
While the single crackers were found to be within their permissible limits of 125 dB(A), with most measuring between 116 to 119 dB(A), they were still found to be higher than last year’s highest reading of 117 dB(A). However, the sound levels touched the outer limits of the permissible levels of 145 dB(C).
In scientific parlance dB(A) represents the average noise levels over a certain period of time and dB(C) represents the maximum peak noise levels reached. The noise levels for single crackers reached 144.5 dB(C).
“The smoke and dust pollution caused by all the crackers seem to be higher than last year,” read the report prepared by Awaaz Foundation. Similar tests will be conducted all over Maharashtra by the MPCB and a comprehensive report will be prepared by October 12 and it will also be shared with the Controller of Explosives. MPCB will also test the crackers for chemical pollutants.
“We will request Controller of Explosives to take the required action against these firecrackers. We will conduct similar tests across Maharashtra till October 12,” said Dr VM Mothgare, Joint Director (Air Pollution Control).
]]>
<![CDATA[Bombay high court raps Maharashtra govt's silence on noise during dahi handi, Ganpati]]>Thu, 07 Sep 2017 18:30:00 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/september-08th-2017​Bombay high court raps Maharashtra govt’s silence on noise during dahi handi, Ganpati
The court noted the noise had crossed permissible levels during Ganpati, but no apparent action had been taken against the violators
MUMBAI Updated: Sep 08, 2017 00:58 IST

Kanchan Chaudhari
Hindustan Times

The bench also expressed displeasure over the fact that the government had not made available a dedicated telephone line for citizens to register noise-related complaints during dahi handi and Ganpati celebrations.
           
           
The Bombay high court on Thursday directed the state government to submit the number of noise pollution complaints it received during the recent dahi handi and Ganpati festivals and what action was taken against the wrongdoers. 
Noting that noise had crossed permissible levels during Ganpati, but no apparent action had been taken against the violators, the division bench of justice Abhay Oka and justice Riyaz Chagla told government pleader Abhinandan Vagyani that now the time had come for him to frankly admit non-compliance of court orders. 
During the course of hearing on a bunch of public interest litigations concerning strict implementation of the Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control) Rules, 2000, the bench also expressed displeasure over the fact that the government had not made available a dedicated telephone line for citizens to register noise-related complaints. 
Advocate Rohaan Cama, who represented one of the petitioners — Aawaz Foundation — said most of the helpline numbers publicised by the government either did not exist or did not work, and the numbers that were working turned out to be telephone lines meant for some other purposes such as the disaster management cell of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC). 
 
Vagyani, on the other hand, submitted it is not that authorities haven’t done anything. Although the state did not fully comply with court directions concerning noise pollution, “we have made sincere attempts to implement the court orders.” 
The court has now posted the bunch of petitions for further hearing on September 29, with a direction to the government pleader to file by September 27 an affidavit giving details of the noise pollution complaints received during the festivals and action taken against the wrongdoers.]]>
<![CDATA[How loud was final immersion day? There's no clear answer]]>Thu, 07 Sep 2017 01:18:52 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/how-loud-was-final-immersion-day-theres-no-clear-answer​Sep 07 2017 : The Times of India (Mumbai)
 
How loud was final immersion day? There's no clear answer
 

Mumbai:
TIMES NEWS NETWORK

 
NGO And MPCB Record Varying Noise Levels
On the final day of Ganeshotsav , the city recorded peak noise levels of 119.8 decibels (dB) at Santacruz, the second highest in four years, according to the readings done by NGO, Awaaz Foundation. Meanwhile, the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB)'s readings showed the city fared better than last year on the last day considering average levels.
Awaaz Foundation measured noise levels in various parts of the city on the last day of immersion. The highest levels recorded are 123.7dB in 2015. This year's highest levels were recorded opposite Santacruz police station.
“While levels dropped last year, this year was the opposite.There was extensive use of noisy firecrackers for prolonged periods of time on the roads in Bandra, Santacruz, Vile Parle, Mahim, Dadar, Cuffe Parade and along the immersion route toward Girgaum Chowpatty .Last-minute changes in noise rules created a lot of confusion in implementation,“ said Sumaira Abdulali, convener of the foundation.
Noise levels at Badamwadi in Kalbadevi were the second highest at 116.7dB. The lowest noise levels of 87dB were recorded at Gokhale Road, Dadar.
According to the Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control) Rules, 2000, the maximum noise level in residential areas should not exceed 55dB in the day and 45dB at night.
On the other hand, MPCB, which records noise levels at 25 locations in Mumbai, found that the average levels were lower compared to 2016. According to MPCB's readings, this year's highest average noise levels of 83dB were recorded at Dadar, lower than Chembur (east) which recorded 89.9 dB in 2016. “It was comparatively quieter this year because the use of DJ set-ups was low. People are more aware and that is showing results,“ said V M Motghare, joint director, MPCB.
The MPCB measures continuous comprehensive noise at the locations between 6 am and midnight. Average levels across the state were between 60-95dB with Pune being one of the noisiest cities. A detailed report will be submitted to the Bombay high court.
Brihanmumbai Sarvajanik Ganeshotsav Samanvay Samiti, the umbrella body of Ganesh mandals, claimed the use of DJs had dropped by 90%.
Abdulali said while the average levels could be lower, peak levels continue to trouble citizens. “While there was reduced use of DJs, brass bands and drums were seen throughout the city. Metal cylinders beaten with hammers, which were used extensively in the suburbs and sporadically in south Mumbai created the highest noise levels, exceeding last year's maximum noise levels,“ she said.

 

 

 
 

 
]]>
<![CDATA[Ganesh immersion noise breaks last year's record]]>Thu, 07 Sep 2017 01:16:41 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/ganesh-immersion-noise-breaks-last-years-record
]]>
<![CDATA[HC slams state over noise pollution rules]]>Tue, 05 Sep 2017 18:30:00 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/hc-slams-state-over-noise-pollution-rules
]]>
<![CDATA[Ganeshotsav 2017 ends with a big bang in Mumbai]]>Tue, 05 Sep 2017 18:30:00 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/ganeshotsav-2017-ends-with-a-big-bang-in-mumbai
]]>
<![CDATA[Mumbai: Union, state government pass the buck on silence zones amid confusion]]>Tue, 05 Sep 2017 11:40:51 GMThttp://awaaz.org/news6/mumbai-union-state-government-pass-the-buck-on-silence-zones-amid-confusion
]]>